The Debate on Lung Cancer Screenings

Blog Image 1-1If you had the choice to cure cancer in a loved one versus not doing so, what would you choose? This may seem like a silly question, but curing early lung cancer may actually be this simple for many heavy smokers that you know.
In a recent interview with Dr. Claudia Henschke of Mount Sinai Hospital, she lays it out to be this straight forward. Dr. Henschke and her colleagues introduced CT scans as an alternative to chest x-rays in the early 1990s. CT scans can detect cancer much earlier, and since a high percentage of those who die of lung cancer could have been saved with early detection, CT scans have been instrumental in lowering lung cancer fatalities.

So, who gets tested? According to the American Cancer Association, you should get a low dose CT scan of your lungs if you are considered a high-risk patient which includes people who are 55 to 74 years and in fairly good health, have a smoking history equivalent to a pack a day for 30 years, and currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. These parameters can include healthy people who don’t suffer from any visible health issues.

Regardless of whether or not people think they are sick, it is recommended to get tested anyways. At Doctors Imaging we provide low dose CT lung screenings for only $99.

There is some concern about the use of CT screenings because the images obtained are so detailed and clear. These scans can indicate the smallest of noncancerous nodules causing some medical professionals to worry about the unnecessary attention the CT scans will cause. These concerns are minimized by having qualified physicians involved with their patients in health care decisions. However, the real question is how many lives can these screenings save? Of the 200,000 people diagnosed every year, early detection can often cure a high percentage.

Here at Doctors Imaging, we think screening is very important.

Low-Dose CT Lung Cancer Screening Recommended By USPSTF

In a groundbreaking move for the American radiology industry, the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has recommended that high-risk patients receive low-dose CT scans to screen for lung cancer. The announcement follows previous evidence which indicated that preventive CT scans are effective in reducing lung cancer deaths. Healthcare professionals across the country are already praising the announcement for sparking an important progression in the fight against cancer. In an interview with The New York Times, Dr. Harold E. Varmus, the director of the National Cancer Institute, said the recommendation would “change the way people think about lung cancer.” Dr. Michael LeFevre, a professor of medicine at the University of Missouri, told the Times that widespread use of CT scans could prevent around 14 percent of lung cancer deaths each year.

 

At Doctors Imaging, we are looking forward to the positive benefits this announcement will have on our patients and their families. As an American College of Radiology accredited facility, we will be working alongside healthcare providers throughout the nation to spread awareness on how low-dose CT scans can prevent lung cancer deaths. While prior studies had been published promoting the benefits of CT screenings, the USPSTF’s endorsement is nonetheless an important step forward for radiologists everywhere. Healthcare professionals nationwide will be working to raise awareness about the importance of CT scans, and their efforts will be assisted by several government organizations, including Congress, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and the National Cancer Institute.

 

We bring this news to you, our loyal patients, because we are dedicated to providing the community with up to date information on how our low-cost, high-quality services can benefit your overall healthcare experience. We offer low-dose CT scans for only $99, a price unmatched by area hospitals. For more on our services, staff, and appointment information, please visit our website (link) or call 504-883-8111 to speak with a live representative.

 

Sources:

“ACR Statement on USPSTF Draft Recommendation for CT Lung Cancer Screening.” Home -. N.p., n.d. Web. 31 July 2013.

Hellmich, Nanci. “Task Force: Lung Cancer Screenings Should Upgrade Tech.”USA TODAY. N.p., 29 July 2013. Web. 31 July 2013.

Tavirnese, Sabrina. “Task Force Urges Scans for Smokers at High Risk.” New York Times. N.p., 29 July 2013. Web. 31 July 2013.