Finding and Treating Prostate Cancer Early

A cancer diagnosis is never an easy moment. But if it has to come, it’s better to get the news while the cancer is still small or new. Given recent advances in detecting adult cancers, oncology doctors are able to inform their patients about how to treat and heal after a cancer diagnosis.

When found in the early stages, one of the most treatable cancers currently is prostate cancer. With higher standards of preventative testing and more information readily available, more men are finding out that they have prostate cancer in its early stages. According to the CDC, prostate cancer is the most common type of cancer in men, and is also one of the leading causes of cancer death in men.

But by keeping annual check-ups and having routine prostate exams, men can catch prostate cancer earlier. This means prostate cancer does not have to be fatal. In fact, many men with prostate cancer will not require aggressive treatment. Instead, their doctors may suggest watchful waiting.

Know the Symptoms of Prostate Cancer

Do you know the signs and symptoms of prostate cancer? When prostate cancer is developing, men will sometimes notice:

  • bloody urine,
  • difficulty with or frequency of urination,
  • and sexual dysfunction.

Do not ignore these early symptoms for fear of judgment or embarrassment, as early detection can be the key to a successful treatment plan. You’ll thank yourself later.

Early Detection with PSA Tests, Prostate Exams and Medical Imaging

The best way to detect prostate cancer is to schedule and keep regular check-ups with your primary care physician, perform PSA (prostate-specific antigen) tests, as well as have regular prostate exams.

If your doctor finds a prostate problem, your next step may be to schedule an ultrasound imaging exam for further evaluation. Many of us closely associate ultrasounds with pregnant women. However, both men and women can benefit from ultrasound imaging. For men, ultrasounds can determine whether there is a cancer growth around the prostate, whether the prostate gland is enlarged, and can help determine the cause of a man’s infertility.

Because of the location of the prostate, physicians and technicians must insert the transducer wand rectally in order to produce the best images. Because an ultrasound exam creates real-time results, doctors will often use them to guide biopsy wands in preparation for surgery. Although the procedure can be uncomfortable, patients should give primary importance to the information that doctors glean from these exams.

Your doctor may also choose to order an MRI of the prostate, which offers higher resolution images and more precision for detection, biopsy, and future treatment if needed.

Are you concerned about the possibility of prostate cancer or disorder? To access advanced medical imaging equipment and radiological techniques for detecting prostate cancer, come to Doctors Imaging. Our patients always pay less than they would at the hospital. And you won’t have to compromise comfort or service. You can call Doctors Imaging 504.883.8111 or request an appointment online.

Diagnosing Chronic Fatigue Syndrome with DTI

Between our work, family, school, and social lives, fatigue is a common feeling among people. Defined as “extreme tiredness or exhaustion,” fatigue is one of the most reported symptoms to physicians. It can be hard for doctors to tell if a patient is simply tired or if there is a contributing condition like chronic fatigue syndrome that may be causing their exhaustion.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is described as more than just day-to-day tiredness. This condition’s symptoms include exhaustion that is both debilitating and without cause. Patients may have feelings of being extremely tired. Chronic fatigue is usually accompanied by impaired memory or concentration, dizziness, inability to stay awake or upright, and overwhelming exhaustion without exertion. Persisting longer than 6 months, this condition requires more than a caffeine fix and a good night’s sleep — it needs medical attention.

The condition affects more than 1 million adults and children in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diagnosis is complicated and usually involves ruling out many other conditions.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome can become more than just debilitating. It can be dangerous as well. Fatigue of this degree can become problematic when the patient is driving or operating heavy machinery. Symptoms related to chronic fatigue can resemble other diseases such as Lyme disease, major depressive disorder, lupus, and hypothyroidism. This makes it difficult for doctors to diagnose these conditions. Physicians would much prefer a standalone test to diagnose CFS. And a 2014 study brings such a test slightly closer to doctors’ clinics.

The additional help in diagnosing this condition comes from using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI).

DTI is a relatively new form of advanced MRI in which the nerve fibers of the brain can be specifically highlighted and imaged to determine possible damage from things like concussions or conditions including chronic fatigue. In the same way that MRIs use sound waves and computer technology in order to image the internal organs, DTI focuses on the nerve fibers in the brain and is able to image them with startling detail. MRIs can show the musculoskeletal and vascular system. But, with DTI, physicians hope to go even deeper into the nerves where doctors can see definitive proof of chronic fatigue syndrome.

In a 2014 study published online in the journal Radiology, researchers studied 15 CFS patients and 14 people selected as age and gender control subjects. When they compared results between the CFS patients and the controls, they found that the CFS group had slightly lower white matter volume, meaning there was less overall white matter in the brain.

Researchers also found that patients complaining of CFS symptoms had high Fractional Anisotropy (FA) values in a certain area of the brain. FA describes how water moves along the nerves within the brain. Results suggested that this area of the brain can serve as a biomarker for CFS where “the more abnormal the tract, the worse the fatigue.”

When the nerve fibers in the brain are experiencing irregularity or degeneration, in combination with the aforementioned symptoms, doctors can diagnose chronic fatigue syndrome faster and with more accuracy. The time delay and inconsistency that was once prominent with this condition can now be eliminated thanks to the advanced MRI technology made by diffusion tensor imaging.

“This is a very common and debilitating disease,” said the study lead author Michael M. Zeineh, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of radiology at Stanford University School of Medicine in Stanford, Calif. “It’s very frustrating for patients because they feel tired and are experiencing difficulty thinking.”

“This is the first study to look at white matter tracts in CFS and correlate them with cortical findings,” Dr. Zeineh said. “It’s not something you could see with conventional imaging.”

Dr. Zeineh added that the findings need to be replicated and expanded upon in future studies to refine the understanding of the relationship between brain structure and CFS.

“Most CFS patients at some point in time have been accused of being hypochondriacs and their symptoms dismissed by others,” Dr. Zeineh said in an interview with NBC Today. “And there is still skepticism in the medical community about the diagnosis. That’s one of the reasons these findings are important.”

DTI Now Available at Doctors Imaging

Doctors Imaging is the first facility in Louisiana to offer DTI exams. If you have more questions about the symptoms of concussion or how DTI works, please visit the dedicated website TheConcussionGroup.com.




This reconstructed magnetic resonance image shows the blue tracks and arrows and yellow tracks and arrows in a single patient. These two tracks are overlaid on their respective track profiles. The green arrows point to the middle temporal region of increased cortical thickness. Source: Radiological Society of North America

Learn more:

5 Reasons to Get Your MRI or CT Scan at Doctors Imaging

Do you need an MRI, Ultrasound or CT scan? Whenever you do, many doctors’ practices assume you’ll have the test performed in their hospital or affiliated facility. After all, it’s convenient for them. On the other hand, you may have different ideas about what’s convenient, comfortable, and affordable for you.

Here are five reasons to choose Doctors Imaging for your next MRI, CT scan, or X-ray instead of the hospital.

  1. 100% Transparent: Be careful. The staff at your doctor’s office may be under pressure to schedule you at their own hospital imaging department — even if it costs you more. Most hospitals are reluctant to tell you about the total cost of your test. In contrast, the service specialists at Doctors Imaging are friendly, accessible, and transparent about the lower cost of our services.
  2. We can save you money: Many hospitals fail to tell you that you may be charged separate reading fees from their radiologists — another 15% to 25% on top of their high prices. At Doctors Imaging, we have one low fee. Does your insurance plan have a high deductible? If so, ask us about our discounted prices for patients who don’t have insurance or prefer not to use it.
  3. High Quality: Doctors Imaging is committed to advanced imaging technology that is meticulously maintained and frequently updated. Our radiologists are board-certified. Our imaging staff is registered and certified. At the end of the day, we produce medical imaging that is as good or better than the exams produced in a busy hospital. And we think you’ll appreciate our calm office environment; it’s nothing like a hospital.
  4. Insurance: We accept every major insurance including Medicare, Medicaid, and Workers Compensation plans. At Doctor Imaging, you may also enjoy significantly lower costs for the portion of your test not covered by insurance.
  5. Convenience: Unfortunately, it’s not unheard for patients to wait weeks for routine tests at other facilities. But at Doctors Imaging, we provide easy scheduling. We can usually offer you an appointment for the same day or the next day. The hospital staff has to juggle scheduled patients as well as sick and critically ill patients. But at Doctors Imaging, you’ll walk through a quiet waiting room on your way to your exam. We also have plenty of free parking on the first floor, just steps from our front door. You’ll be in and out of our Metairie office before you know it. And we get your exam results to your doctor fast — usually the next day. When your results are ready, you’ll have 24/7 access to our online Patient Portal so you can read your reports and see your pictures for yourself.

Here’s a reminder: It’s OK to talk to your doctor and their staff about skipping the hospital the next time you need nuclear medicine images, an X-ray or any other imaging exam. You have the right to choose your imaging facility. You can even choose a different imaging facility after leaving your doctor’s office. It’s true. You can take your written orders wherever you like or simply ask your doctor to send your imaging order to Doctors Imaging.

By choosing Doctors Imaging, you’ll save time and money while you take charge as an active participant in your health care. Call us to start getting the quality, convenience, and service you deserve. You can also request your next appointment online.

Interested in learning more about what it’s like to visit Doctors Imaging? Try these resources:

Tell your doctor you’re choosing Doctors Imaging

Should I Get an X-Ray, MRI, or CT Scan for My Injury?

Every patient is different as well as every injury. The way people injure themselves, the condition of the affected area prior to the injury, as well as the patient’s response to injury, are all factors in assessing the damage as well as creating a plan for the restoration of the area. If you have obtained an injury you feel you can’t care for on your own, you should speak to your doctor about scheduling a procedure that will be best able to determine the extent of the damage and after you and your physician can discuss plans to heal and avoid further injury. Here is a list of common medical procedures that your doctor may schedule for you in order to determine the degree of injury.

An X-Ray


An X-Ray is usually the first procedure a doctor will schedule for an injury, particularly sports-related injuries. X-rays are some of the oldest and most used forms of medical imaging. X-rays are common procedures for joint and bone fractures and breaks. X-rays are also used for examining arthritic joints and determining the location and condition of cancer cells in the bones. X-ray procedures are totally painless and just require the patient to lay very still for the length of the imaging as the slightest involuntary movement can distort the image and the procedure will have to be restarted. Getting an X-ray will be the fastest way to determine if there has been a bone break, dislocation or fracture.

An MRI Scan

Your doctor may also order an MRI scan if the injury cannot be properly determined from an X-ray or if your injury pertains to any of the joint, muscular or skeletal systems of the body. An MRI scan would be particularly helpful if your injury has caused any type of vascular problem such as internal bleeding or clotting or if there is soft tissue damage. MRI scans are useful in determining any overall damage from an injury beyond what an X-ray can relate. MRI scans contain a minute amount of pain from an intravenous injection of contrast material but nothing further. Contrast material will not have a reaction in the body excluding a slightly cool sensation unless the patient has an allergy to iodine.

A CT Scan

Your doctor may also order a CT scan for an injury. Do not be confused if your doctor orders a few tests for you. It does not necessarily indicate an extreme amount of physical damage. Your doctor could just be trying to get the best angles and images in order to make the most thorough diagnosis and by extension the best medical plan for mending your injury. Your doctor may order you a CT scan if he is particularly worried about tissue damage. CT scans using contrast material are able to create cross-sectional images of organs and tissues as well as highlighting which are healthy and which are not. CT scans are relatively painless as well, excluding the pinprick of the IV needle, but in some cases, the contrast material is swallowed to outline the digestive system.

Make the Choice

If you have an injury that cannot be helped by over the counter medications and naturalistic healing methods, you should speak to your doctor about ordering some of these procedures because a serious injury left unattended can become a much more harmful problem. Without proper medical attention and testing, a slight injury can morph into a complex affliction. Even with injuries that feel minimal in pain should be examined by a doctor in order to avoid further complications and injury to the area. The advances in medical technology have provided us with the tools and resources to make better choices concerning patient experience and healing.

Making a decision today? Just click here to schedule your medical imaging appointment in New Orleans.

What is the Difference Between MRI and MRA?


Did you know that if you took the blood vessels of an average adult and spread them out, they would be over 100,000 miles long? That is a lot of arteries, vessels, veins, and capillaries to look through when a patient comes to us needing vascular imaging. That is why both the patient and the doctor appreciate the benefits that MRA technology allow.

Because they are so closely related, trying to understand the difference between MRI and MRA procedures can be difficult for the average patient. But when we look closer, there are actually a lot of differences but a lot of similarities as well.

What is an MRA?

An MRA or magnetic resonance angiogram is when MRI technology is used to image the blood vessels of the body. Without making a single incision, physicians can see the many minuscule and convoluted pathways of blood through the body clearly. Why is this important? The way blood moves through the body is telling of the body’s current state. Is blood moving too quickly? The patient could have high blood pressure that could lead to a cardiovascular episode. Is the blood moving too slowly? There could be a blockage in the body that if left untreated, could become a coronary thrombosis, or in layman’s terms, a heart attack.

In many cases, other methods of imaging like CT scans and ultrasounds cannot obtain the same kind of information that an MRA can. An MRA is a form of MRI testing, meaning it uses radio waves along with a rotating magnetic field in order to image the blood vessels of the body. So in many ways, MRI and MRA are similar but MRA is used primarily for the imaging the vascular system. MRIs are used for multiple reasons like imaging the musculoskeletal system and soft tissue examination.

The difference between an MRA and MRI become more clear when we understand what an MRA can see and how it is administered. MRAs examine the blood pathways between the brain, kidneys, and legs and often use contrast material to help vessels and potential blockages to be highlighted. Contrast material is not used in every MRI that is performed and MRIs usually have a larger area to examine rather than a single vein or vessel. Contrast material is useful to help highlight problem areas and to help physicians perform other procedures with a clear image of the area. Contrast material assists physicians and technicians when they are searching for the following:

  • Clots, bulges or aneurysms or fatty buildups in the blood vessels leading the brain.
  • Tears or aneurysms in the aorta leading away from the body
  • Stenosis or narrowing of the blood vessels in the body
  • Other anomalies and abnormalities in the blood vessels

MRAs and MRIs do not use radiation in order to make images and they take about the same amount of time, about 30 minutes, depending on the patient’s movements and what is being examined. Be sure to take out all metallic objects in the body and tell your doctor if you think you may be pregnant.

So you can see there are a few differences between an MRI and MRA but they both help patients live healthier lives and help doctors provide high-quality treatment.

Ready to make your appointment, you can request an appointment online or call our office at 504-833-8111 Monday through Friday 8 AM to 6 PM to speak with a representative.

How DTI Is Aiding Studies of Concussions, Chronic Fatigue and Autism

Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) exams are receiving more and more attention in the public and medical field because of the light they have shed on certain neurological and mental conditions. DTI is an advanced form of MRI technology that is able to closely follow the flow of water throughout the brain’s pathways giving doctors a better understanding of brain injuries and connectivity.


DTI is used for determining the extent of brain damage from causes such as concussions. Concussions can happen during car accidents and other serious head injuries.

MRIs vs DTI for Concussions

Unlike conventional MRIs that use magnetic fields and computer technology to excite and then map the hydrogen atoms of the body, DTI machinery tracks the pathway of water throughout the brain. Because water in the brain only goes in one direction, it is easier to track this motion and thus map the different nerve paths of the brain as they are very complex and convoluted.

Once the nerve pathways are clearly mapped, neurologists can see if there is damage, bleeds or symptoms of other neurological or mental conditions.

Thanks to DTI, concussions are now being more thoroughly imaged. Before the advanced technology of DTI, concussions could be examined through conventional MRIs but small bleeds and nerve damage were always difficult to identify — especially in the white matter areas of the brain. Now, doctors can track the nerve pathways in the brain with high clarity and understand the genetic and biological causes of some medical conditions.

DTI and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Recently, DTI has been used to identify brain abnormalities that lead to chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Feeling fatigued is not an unusual symptom to have, but for some people, fatigue cannot be fought with adequate sleep or stress-relieving activities. Thanks to imaging techniques, the causes of chronic fatigue syndrome have finally been identified.

In a 2014 study published online in the journal Radiology, researchers found that those complaining of CFS symptoms had “lower white matter volume” as well as high FA values (measurement of diffusion of water in the specific tract within the right hemisphere), suggesting that this is the area of the brain where “the more abnormal the tract, the worse the fatigue.”

DTI, Fragile X and Autism

In another 2014 study, DTI was instrumental in uncovering the area of the brain that possibly contributes to autism. Scientists determined that Fragile X syndrome is the leading cause of mental developmental issues and the most frequent cause of autism spectrum disorders. Their conclusion found that FMRP (fragile X mental retardation protein) is critical in brain development and that if the correct positioning of brain cells during the development of the cortex is not made, autistic traits can emerge as a child becomes older. Source: Scientists at VIB and KU Leuven (Belgium), in collaboration with Tor Vergata University (Italy) and VU University of Amsterdam (The Netherlands).

DTI Now Available at Doctors Imaging

These factors could not have been studied in such high detail without the help of DTI. This advanced imaging technology could help scientists find the causes and cures for more diseases and conditions in the years to come.
Doctors Imaging is the first facility in Louisiana to offer DTI exams. If you have more questions about the symptoms of concussion, loss of sensation after a head injury or how DTI works, please visit the dedicated website TheConcussionGroup.com.

The History of Medical Imaging

The first X-RayMedical imaging is a form of technology that has revolutionized the medical field in the past century.  With these new innovations, doctors were able to elevate the standard of practice and the experience of the patient. Now, areas of pain or trouble can be non-invasively examined and treatment can begin without the patient even needing to go under. But when did the innovation of medical imaging begin?

Read below to take a trip down memory lane and find out how the medical field and the technology industry have been working together to build a better, healthier world.

Röntgen performs X-Ray in 1895

Professor Wilhelm Röntgen accidentally discovers the ability to look through the skin and see the bones of the body while performing experiments on another project. While working with a cathode ray generator, he noticed an image that was left when the cathode rays came into contact with the vacuum tube. He performed the first X-ray on his wife’s hand and even gave the technology the name we use today, calling this discovery “X” rays because they were unsure what exactly they were. This invention was eventually standardized by William Coolidge and his X-ray known as the “Coolidge tube” is what all modern X-ray machines are based from.  The first X-rays required at least 11 minutes of exposure to produce a quality image. Now X-rays take only a few seconds and they use about 2% of the radiation amount seen in the early 20th century machines.

Scientists Use Ultrasounds in the 1960s

The basics of sonar had been discovered and utilized during World War II as a form of maritime warfare. In the early 1960s, scientists discovered that sending sound waves into the body would bounce off the internal structures and then returned to the ultrasound machine to be reformatted into images for doctors to see. This allowed doctors to non-invasively search for tumors and other growths.

Damadian Discovers MRI in 1970

Dr. Raymond Damadian discovers that different animal tissues emit different signals, as well as that cancerous tissues, take much longer to return the signal sent through them. This is the basis for magnetic resonance imaging. In 1977, Dr. Damadian created the first full-body MRI machine which he named the “Indomitable.”

Hounsfield Invents CT Scans in 1972

The 1970s showed the first instance of computer technology mixing into the medical field with Sir Godfrey Hounsfield’s invention of the CT machine. He theorizes that you could see into an object if you took X-rays from different angles of the object through a machine that would appear as “slices” which could then be put together to form an image. With his idea, he formed the first “axial tomography” machine which we now know as the CT machine. In 1979, he received the Nobel Prize in Medicine and was later knighted by the British Royal Family.

Since then, all of these machines have entered into the digital age and are now updated with the latest technology available. This means that there is less potential risk for patients as well as a greater ability to diagnose and treat.

Looking for medical imaging in Louisiana? At Doctors Imaging, we’re Radiologists concerned with patient care. Meet our Radiologists or request your next medical impaging appointment online.

A Look at Doctors Imaging’s Medical Equipment

At Doctors Imaging, we like to provide the best service, staff, and equipment along with the best price for our patients. We believe that everyone should have access to these machines so that they can be confident in their treatment plans and knowledgeable about their health conditions.

We have a 3T MRI and we offer an open MRI for the patients that feel uncomfortable or claustrophobic in the traditional MRI. A 3T MRI is the most powerful MRI machine for every part of the body and we are the region’s first freestanding center to offer its capabilities. There are other facilities and hospitals that use the 1.5T MRIs, but at Doctors Imaging, we want the most powerful equipment and since insurance companies usually charge the same price no matter what the equipment is, you can have the best equipment and images for a lower price than you would pay at a hospital.

In addition to our MRI machines, we also offer the low-dose CT machine, a powerful CT machine with the lowest radiation settings possible. We use the Toshiba Lightning Aquillon CT scanner with Adaptive Iterative Dose Reduction 3D software. With this technology, multiple “slices” or pictures of the examined area can be provided to doctors allowing them to see further and deeper into the body so they can give a thorough diagnosis and treatment plan. This machine allows for up to 75% reduction rate in radiation as opposed to many other CT machines on the market. We understand that radiation exposure is a concern for many of our patients which is why we dedicate ourselves to providing the best and safest care possible.

At Doctors Imaging, we also provide digital X-rays so there is less radiation exposure from this as opposed to the traditional X-ray machines. We also offer 3D ultrasounds so that expectant mothers, as well as medical patients, can have the most in-depth and detailed images of their babies and bodies available to them.

We want people to know that if you need a medical imaging procedure, you are not required to go to a hospital. Instead, you can come to Doctors Imaging in Metairie and have an immediate appointment, almost no waiting time, fast results and a great affordable price.

Visit our Make an Appointment page or call 504-883-8111 for the best days and times for your imaging procedure.  

Using Medical Imaging to Diagnose Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease that attacks the protective layers surrounding the nerve tracts in the brain and can cause difficulty walking as well as pain performing everyday movements. Every case of MS and MS symptoms are different. Some people have symptoms that resolve in a few weeks or months. But for others, the condition has a much more permanent presence in their life.

Multiple Sclerosis is a common disease, yet difficult to track. Because global health institutions do not mandate that doctors report new cases and because symptoms can be invisible for many years, there is no definitive number of those diagnosed with MS every year. Some experts estimate that there are about 2.3 million people with MS around the world with 200 new cases diagnosed every week. That is almost as many people as the entire city of Houston.

With such high numbers of people diagnosed, what causes multiple sclerosis? No one is sure, but most point to a genetic factor or some type of environmental contributor — the cause of MS is still debated. MS symptoms include sensational disruptions, problems controlling movement, lethargy and visual complications. As stated previously though, these symptoms can be minimal and inconsistent, making it harder for patients to recognize their symptoms and for doctors to diagnose.

One of the best exams for doctors needing to diagnose MS is using MRI. MRIs use a combination of magnetic fields and radio waves in order to create images of the internal organs. MRIs are particularly adept at imaging the tissues and nervous structures of the body as well as identifying musculoskeletal disorders. MRIs can detect the subtle changes in the brain and spinal cord that are indicative of MS. MRIs are extremely safe, noninvasive and require no radiation, making them the preferred method for MS diagnosis.

At Doctors Imaging, we also use
NeuroQuant to better examine patients suspected of having memory loss, Multiple Sclerosis, brain trauma other neurologic conditions. NeuroQuant is FDA-cleared software that is a part of the routine MRI protocol that is available upon request from referring physicians that need volumetric analysis when making clinical assessments for any disease that may cause alterations in brain anatomy.

If you have other questions about MRIs, NeuroQuant, or other services at Doctors Imaging, feel free to contact our offices at 504-883-8111 or Request an Appointment.

How Does a Head Injury Result in Sensory Loss?

Whenever accidents or injuries occur, there is always a concern for the residual effects. Prospects of surgery, rehabilitation, or discomfort are never welcome. But for many people, the problems that come after a traumatic injury can be even more debilitating. Ask any physician and they will readily tell you that the worse kind of injuries to treat are those that affect the head. Because the brain is such a complex and unpredictable organ, the effects and ramifications of injuries to the brain can be difficult to determine or map with consistency.

There are a number of factors that help doctors determine the extent and condition of the brain after an injury occurs including:

  • the severity of the injury
  • the location of the injury
  • the medical response to the injury (response time / procedures / medicines)
  • the rate of recovery

There are five senses and each can have different effects after a traumatic brain injury occurs. Sight, taste, smell, hearing, and touch are the ways that our brain receives information and then interprets that information for us to use. But when the brain is the injured body part, any one of these senses can be impacted.

Sometimes the direct impact is not even needed to create an injury. Sometimes just the shaking or rattling of the brain inside the skull can be enough to cause damage. When this occurs, the brain can begin to swell or bleed. Because of the limited area within the cranial cavity, the brain has no space to relieve the pressure or release the blood and as such, damage ensues — or worse, death occurs.

Types & Causes of Sensory Loss After Brain Injury

To begin, the brain is divided into different sections. The different sections control different functions of the body and interpret different signals so certain injuries will exhibit themselves in different parts of the brain. The parietal lobe, located at the top of the head, is the part of the brain that interprets sensational signals and tells us where our body is in location to different objects in our surroundings. Injury to this area can be the cause of a sensory loss, particularly in terms of our translation of touch.

Let’s take a closer look at the types and causes of sensory loss that can happen after a brain injury.

  1. Loss of sight or disruption of sight is a common side effect of a traumatic brain injury. The occipital lobe, located at the back of the skull, is the part of the brain that controls one’s ability to see. When the occipital lobe is damaged, effects such as eye muscle weakness or double vision can occur known as diplopia. The sudden inability to optically tolerate light is a common occurrence known as photophobia. Other presentations of an occipital lobe injury include involuntary eye movements (nystagmus) or the loss of vision in one eye (hemianopsia). The loss of sight differs from other senses in that there is a slightly larger possibility of it returning as opposed to hearing or smell that are usually permanent injuries.
  2. Hearing problems are another sensory problem that often occurs after an accident or fall. Sometimes normal daily activities can sound unbearably loud. Other common symptoms of brain damage are the inability to filter or recognize sounds or prolonged ringing in the ears, a condition called tinnitus. Luckily with the advancement of technology, devices such as cochlear implants and hearing aids can help those who are dealing with hearing problems.
  3. Smell and taste are two senses that heavily influence each other. Almost 70% of taste is contributed to smell and the smell is the strongest sense in connection with our memories. So when one becomes damaged, the other usually suffers as well. Usually, if there is a frontal lobe injury, the resulting nerve damage can contribute to a loss of taste. The olfactory bulbs lie beneath the frontal lobe and can be the cause of anosmia (or loss of smell) if injured.

For those that do experience a loss of one of their senses, options such as surgery, physical therapy, and counseling should be considered in order to help combat the problem or learning to adjust to life without that sense. If you or someone you know has experienced a serious injury and is complaining of sensory disruption of loss, please seek medical supervision immediately.

The physician may order an MRI in order to determine if there is bleeding in or around the brain. Newer MRI techniques are now being developed to evaluate traumatic brain injuries. DTI is an advanced brain imaging procedure that can measure the extent of a brain injury when other tests are negative and symptoms persist. Learn more about these exams at theconcussiongroup.com.

If you have other questions about sensory loss, brain injuries or medical imaging procedures, speak to your physician or radiologist about scheduling a consultation. For more help, call 504-883-8111.